Filter by surname: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ | By department: Staff  Students  | Show all

Dr David Evans

Senior Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Sociology

David’s research focuses on the sociology, geography and anthropology of consumption with a particular interest in food and sustainability. He is fundamentally concerned with questions of value, which in turn entails a focus on the nature of exchange (in its various forms - economic and otherwise), and on related issues of ‘worth’ and qualities. Of particular interest are the ways in which the value of things, persons and practices are constructed and negotiated at the interface of economic, technological and cultural processes. Theoretically, his interest is in bringing theories of practice into closer dialogue with related traditions – principally ANT, conventions theory and governmentality perspectives. Substantively, he is interested in bringing understandings of consumption into closer dialogue with accounts of provisioning and political/ moral economy via a focus on the interlinkages in commodity chains, and on the role played by intermediaries. Empirically, this leads him in two different (but perhaps related) directions. Firstly, he is interested in how conventions are assembled and sustained (such expectations of ‘freshness’ in food systems). Secondly, he is interested in the ‘responsibilisation’ of the consumer and the cultural politics of food. In both cases, he is particularly interested in the role of retailers and supermarkets.

David has recently completed a number of externally funded research projects:

  1. Household, Retailers and Food Waste Transitions: He was PI on this Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded project. In addition to developing social scientific understandings of household food waste, this research focused on the ways in which sustainability challenges are framed, interpreted and responded to. Particular attention was paid to the role of civil society and cultural intermediaries in mobilizing different economic actors. This project included a significant programme of knowledge exchange activities
  2. Eco-Innovation and Consumer Behaviour: He was CoI on this ESRC project that explored a number of case studies in order to better understand the connections between innovation processes and processes of household consumption
  3. The Evolution of Water Practices in Developing and Emerging Markets: David worked with Alison Browne on this Unilever funded project.

Prior to this, much of his previous research focused on how consumption relates to the dynamics of everyday life, domestic spaces and material culture. Here, he explored a number of substantive issues including food provisioning, waste, laundry, lighting and sustainable living. Parallel to this, he has engaged with the theory and politics of ‘behaviour change’ and considered the ways in which this agenda can be opened up to social scientific engagement and critique. David continues to work on these long-standing interests with colleagues at the SCI and the University of Sheffield under the auspices of an ESRC ‘Nexus’ grant (led by Dr Matt Watson).

Phone: +44(0) 161 275 0258

Email: david.evans@manchester.ac.uk

Publications

Selected documents

Evans, D. (2015) Researching (with) major food retailers: levelling and leveraging the terms of engagement, Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies, 15(3), pp.33-39.

Abstract

Read more

Evans, D. (2014) Food Waste: Home Consumption, Material Culture and Everyday Life, London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic

In recent years, food waste has risen to the top of the political and public agenda, yet until now there has been no scholarly analysis applied to the topic as a complement and counter-balance to campaigning and activist approaches.

Read more

Evans, D. (2012) 'Binning, gifting and recovery: the conduits of disposal in household food consumption', Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 30 (6), pp. 1123-1137.

This paper unpacks the overwhelming tendency for surplus food to be cast as ‘excess’ and placed in conduits—typically the bin—that connect it to the waste stream.

Read more

Evans, D. (2011) 'Beyond the Throwaway Society: Ordinary Domestic Practice and a Sociological Approach to Household Food Waste', Sociology, 46 (1), pp. 1-16

Abstract

Read more

Evans, D. (2011) 'Thrifty, green or frugal: Reflections on sustainable consumption in a changing economic climate', Geoforum, 42 (5), pp. 550-557

Abstract

Read more